Bichok Wan Kot

Bichok Wan Kot

Doctoral Candidate -- Sociology

Bichok is completing a PhD entitled Lost in Transition: Changing Dynamics of Traditional Nuäär Gender Roles and the Migrant Experience
The research investigates the choices and challenges confronting a little-known and vulnerable migrant group: the Nuäär of Sudan and Ethiopia. It focuses on how the changes in gender roles as result of migration and resettlement in Australia affects Nuäär family life, especially men’s experiences. It uses a qualitative research strategy with a constructivist theoretical framework, which emphasizes how knowledge is constructed through human experience and interaction. The methodology employed is the constructivist’s grounded theory as a research approach and use structured and unstructured interviews, focus groups discussion and participant observation as methods of data collection. Constructivist grounded theory is also used as to analyse the experiences of change for the women and men.

Name

Name

Job Position

Rama Agung-Igusti

Rama Agung-Igusti

Doctoral Candidate -- Community Research

Leila Rahimi

Leila Rahimi

Doctoral Candidate -- Social Work

Immigration is a challenge for those who migrate to a new country. However, for contemporary immigrants, the experience of settlement occurs in an increasingly technological era with internet access, mobile phone usage and social media, making it different from the experience of previous generations. This study explores the settlement experiences of Iranian residents in Australia with particular reference to their use of social media. It includes attention to online connections and face-to -face connections as well as the structure and function of social networks in relation to settlement experiences. Data was gathered unsung interviews and descriptive social network mapping in order to gain cumulative insights into the settlement experiences and social networks of people from Iran in Australia. This research will contribute to contemporary understandings of settlement experiences particularly for Iranian immigrants and draw out implications for social policy, community development programs, and service design and delivery.

Samuel Keast

Samuel Keast

Doctoral Candidate -- Critical Community Psychology

Alexandra Ramirez

Alexandra Ramirez

Doctoral Candidate

Alexandra’s research is comparative and focuses on cultural identity/otherness and belonging. This multidisciplinary project juxtaposes the experiences of two immigrant groups, Nigerians and Colombians with the experiences of local residents, Australians in Melbourne and Italians in Trentino, as they perceive perceive one another in their respective social environments.Who is the other and how is ‘this other’ perceived and mediated by agency and structure across the respective geographical contexts are the questions this research seeks to answer. Scholarly work about otherness and post-colonialism informs the theoretical framework. A phenomenological approach underpins the methodological combination of narrative analysis and ethnography. Semi-structured interviews, participant observations and secondary sources configure the data collection instruments in both locations, Melbourne and Trento. The findings will provide a deeper understanding of human diversity, cross-cultural interactions and wellbeing, offering significant insights for policy makers, organisational actors and other stakeholders involved in the process of fostering inclusive societies.

Linda Chiodo

Linda Chiodo

Doctoral Candidate -- Community Psychology